What is the Best Age to Get Pregnant?

what is the best age to get pregnantDeciding  the right time to get pregnant is probably one of the most important decisions a woman has to make as it affects every aspect of her daily life. There are many factors to consider when making this life-changing decision and a woman’s age can generally reveal what’s really going on in her life at that time.

Ages 20 – 24

Physically:

  • most fertile years because eggs are still comparatively young
  • good chance of getting pregnant
  • not at risk for hypertension during pregnancy
  • low risk of miscarriages – 9.5%
  • low risk of birth defects such as Down Syndrome (1 in 1,667)
  • less likely to give birth with chromosomal abnormalities (1 in 526)
  • optimal fitness, making delivery easier
  • decreased risk for breast and ovarian cancer

Emotionally:

  • more concerned with looks and weight
  • is still in need of a social life
  • relationship with a partner may still not be stable

Financially:

  • still focused on career goals
  • is not yet financially stable

Ages 25 – 29

Physically

  • still a low risk of miscarriages (10%)
  • still a low risk of birth defects such as Down Syndrome (1 in 1,250)
  • low risk of conceiving a baby with chromosomal abnormality (1 in 476)
  • still relatively fit in terms of having a child for the first time

Emotionally:

  • relationship with a partner may be more stable
  • self satisfied
  • can manage time more easily
  • able to prioritize family’s needs

Financially:

  • higher chance of having achieved career goals
  • more equipped financially

Ages 30 – 34

Physically:

  • chances of success are higher if undergoing treatment for fertility (25 to 28%)
  • chances of cesarean section are twice as high as for women in their 20s
  • fertility begins to decline
  • miscarriage rate – 11.7%
  • risk of Down Syndrome (1 in 952)
  • risk of having a baby with chromosomal abnormality (1 in 385)

Emotionally:

  • emotionally ready to start a family
  • still has the energy to take care of a toddler

Financially:

  • financially stable
  • usually at the peak of one’s career, hence might have a hard time leaving one’s job if needed

Ages 35 – 39

Physically:

  • fertility continues to decline
  • risk of high blood pressure is doubled
  • risk of hypertension (10 to 20 %)
  • gestational diabetes is two to three times more common
  • labor tends to take longer
  • amniocentesis or some other prenatal screening may be recommended
  • risks of Down syndrome or chromosomal disorders begin to rise significantly
  • chance of having multiple births increases significantly
  • miscarriage rate rises to 18 %
  • stillbirths are about twice as high

Emotionally:

  • prone to stress and anxiety
  • prone to midlife crisis
  • unsure of one’s ability or patience to care for a toddler

Financially:

  • can opt to leave work to spend more time at home

Ages 40 – 44

Physically:

  • pregnancy produces estrogen that has beneficial effects on the heart, bones, and other organs
  • may  be more prone to hemorrhoids
  • displacement of tissues in the uterus and vagina
  • muscles and other tissues are less elastic
  • most pregnancies end in miscarriage
  • many infertility clinics reject patients older than 39

Emotionally:

  • has more experience and maturity needed to raise a child
  • anxiety over generation-gap issues
  • anxiety over the possibility of early demise and inability of seeing the child through or beyond his teens
  • fatigue seems to be more pronounced

Financially:

  • financially stable and able to provide for the needs of a growing child
  • fear of being retired and no longer financially able to support child through college

 

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